Don’t be Fooled by Internet Virus Phishing Scams

Phishing annoys me to no end. Don’t people have anything better to do than trying to steal from others or create chaos? According to this (old) article, the US and Korea top the list of countries for number of phishing hosts. And I can only assume that phishing has gotten worse in the last 3 years since this was published. Additionally, these days, Korea is undergoing a big change in the sophistication of phishing scams – particularly “voice phishing” (phone phishing) scams.

I even heard the story of one lady in Korea who received a phone call telling her that her son had been kidnapped, and if she ever wanted to see him alive again she must immediately transfer X amount of money into an unknown bank account. She did so, and hurried home to call the police (I assume). Upon arriving home she found her son watching TV and eating snacks. She cried out, “Are you OK?” to which he replied, “Of course, I just arrived home from school on the bus.”  I don’t know all the facts about this story, or if it is 100% true or not, but the fact remains that it is 100% believable, because people do have a tendency to get fearful, emotional, and in a “fight-or-flight” mode when they think that something has gone terribly wrong.

So, in order to help other people not get into this same kind of fearful, emotional mode when surfing the Internet and a “Virus Alert!” pops up on their screen, I will break down the phishing scam that I encountered online today while looking for 2010 Olympics Coverage. With a little understanding of what to look for, more people would be able to avoid accidentally downloading virus programs that actually claim to be “virus cleaners.”

And for those who are convinced that viruses just “pop up” when they’re not looking, check out this post.

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Oh No! Virus Alert!

Today as I was browsing the web, searching for 2010 Olympics Coverage, I was suddenly confronted by this “Virus Alert!” message:

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And Here I Thought IE 6 was Broken

badge_saveie6Internet Explorer 6 has given me a good share of headaches over these past few months. Every time I make a website, I have a process: from design, to code, and finally to fixing my code (particularly for IE). Wouldn’t it be great if just for once the code I wrote really worked everywhere it was supposed to? Wouldn’t it be great if the site I create and use in Firefox (with such wonderful tools as Firebug to help out) was the same site that all my friends could see, on the first try? Sometimes I can spend weeks trying to figure out one small, seemingly insignificant, yet incredibly frustrating problem.

But then there are times when Internet Explorer 6 just surprises the pants off of me with it’s wonderful ingenuity!

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Website Creation: STEP 3 – Testing and Maintenance

JekkilekkiStep 3 – Testing and Maintenance

This is the 4th part of a 4-part look at my website creation process. Here I will present a list of the Testing and Maintenance steps I generally take as I progress through any website creation effort. Hope you enjoy my list!

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The State of the Web in South Korea

As anyone who’s lived in Korea for even a short time is probably aware, this country is on the bleeding-edge of technology. They have cell phones, computers, LCD and HD TVs galore and as the video on this website mentions, Korea has become a virtual testbed for the newest and latest technologies. This article from the JoongAng Daily gives a few notable numbers:

Korea is one of the world’s most wired nations, with more than two-thirds of homes connected to high-speed Internet and more than nine out of 10 people owning a mobile phone.

However, for all its technological glitter, the state of South Korea’s Internet is anything but golden.

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Tools for Cross-Browser CSS Checking (A Follow-up to My IE Gripe)

ie7Since posting my Gripe Against Internet Explorer, I’ve had a little time to be better able to come to grips with the difficulties, challenges, and (dare I say?) adventure involved in programming websites to be viewable by the majority of the population.  In my last post I found that nearly 70% of the Internet browsing marketshare is owned by Internet Explorer, and since none of the IEs supports Cascading Style Sheets in the same ways, I was forced to learn how to tell each version of IE to read and display my code as it was intended.

Interestingly enough, as minor code changes were making massive differences in the display of IE6 and IE7, the other browsers I worked with (Opera 8, 9 , Firefox 3, Google Chrome, Safari 3, Camino 1) were not affected by my code changes at all, and continued to consistently display the page I wanted.

During my time of “learning the ropes” of IE programming, I ran across a number of very useful tools on the Internet that aid in the development of websites, especially cross-browser IE compatibility checking.  Here, I’ll present the tools I’ve found, a look at my current “under-development” website in a number of browsers, and a few links to some more IE CSS bugs that I’ve found helpful.

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